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Wallace Making 900th NASCAR Start with American Ethanol



(NAFB)--This weekend at Chicagoland Speedway - NASCAR legend Kenny Wallace will make his 900th NASCAR start. He will be driving the RAB Racing Number 29 ToyotaCare, American Ethanol Toyota Camry. Wallace will also compete Friday night in the Camping World Truck Series race at Chicagoland Speedway in the Number 81 SS Green Light American Ethanol Toyota Tundra thanks to Illinois farmers and the Illinois Corn Marketing Board. Wallace will be amongst an elite group of drivers in the “900 Club” - which includes Richard Petty, Ricky Rudd, Terry Labonte, Mark Martin, Darrell Waltrip, Bobby Labonte, Jeff Burton, Dale Earnhardt and Dale Jarrett. Wallace says the 900th start means a lot to him. He says it’s a dream come true - adding that Toyota and American Ethanol have cared about getting him to his goal of 900 starts. Besides the thrill of racing - he says they have also given him the chance to meet American farmers who have grown the corn to supply NASCAR race cars and to travel the country educating people on the benefits of American Ethanol. Wallace says he’s been on farms, learned to drive a combine, driven tractors and more. He thanks everyone at Toyota and American Ethanol for this terrific ride outside of the race track.
 
To put this milestone of 900 starts into perspective - Wallace has traveled more than 276-thousand miles across the Sprint Cup, Nationwide and Camping World Truck Series over his 24-year career. He has garnered nine wins, 75 top five finishes, 204 top 10 finishes and an astonishing 198,164 completed laps. Wallace has also earned the title of Nationwide Series Most Popular Driver three times.
 
American Ethanol spokesman Jon Holzfaster - a Nebraska farmer - says it has taken boundless energy and drive to reach this remarkable milestone of 900 races. He says Wallace has devoted the same tireless approach to building the American Ethanol brand and showcasing the important contributions family farmers and the ethanol industry make to the county.

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